Tech Note 562-22: Powder-Actuated Fasteners in Cold-Formed Steel Construction
Tech Note 562-22: Powder-Actuated Fasteners in Cold-Formed Steel Construction

This Technical Note updates and replaces Tech Note 562

Summary: Power-actuated fasteners (PAF’s) are industry standard for attachment of cold-formed steel (CFS) steel framing members, usually track, to concrete, CMU or steel structural elements. “Power-actuated” is the broad category used to refer to fasteners which are driven directly through the CFS and into the substrate, using a powder, gas, compressed air or electro-mechanically driven tool. Efficient installation of framing systems is greatly enhanced by the use of PAF’s. For CFS-to-steel applications, the specification AISI S100 addresses all relevant limit states with equations and safety/ resistance factors. For CFS-to-concrete, limited guidance is provided but not all limit states are covered. This technical note will provide design guidance based on AISI S100, as well as installation and good detailing practice.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F100-23: Design of Clip Angle Bearing Stiffeners
Tech Note F100-23: Design of Clip Angle Bearing Stiffeners

Summary: Clip angles are commonly used in cold-formed steel constructions to attach floor joists to the rim track. Clip angles can also work as bearing stiffeners to reinforce the web crippling strength of the floor joists at the bearing locations. As the length of the clip angle may significantly influence the floor joist web crippling strength, it is critical to ensure the minimum length of the clip angle in design.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F101-12: Screws for Cold-Formed Steel-To-Wood and Wood-To-Cold-Formed Steel Attachments
Tech Note F101-12: Screws for Cold-Formed Steel-To-Wood and Wood-To-Cold-Formed Steel Attachments

Summary: Screws are often used to attach cold-formed steel (CFS) framing to wood members or wood structural panel decking to CFS joists or rafters. The AISI North American Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members (AISI S100) provides design equations for screw connection capacity for CFS members. The National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) provides design equations for fastener/connection capacity (nails, wood screws, bolts, etc.) in wood members. The Engineered Wood Association (APA) and the building codes offer several resources for determining the capacity of screw connections attaching wood sheathing. This Tech Note reviews these resources and discusses design and detailing of these fastener connections.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F102-21: Screw Fastener Selection For Cold-Formed Steel Frame Construction
Tech Note F102-21: Screw Fastener Selection For Cold-Formed Steel Frame Construction

This Technical Note updates and replaces CFSEI Tech Note F102-11

Summary: Specifying the proper fastener is necessary to assure the proper performance of the connections used in cold-formed steel construction. Cold-formed steel connections primarily utilize externally threaded fasteners, so embedment is not the controlling parameter. Instead, the design of the fastener along with the thickness of the steel govern the value of the connection. This Tech Note provides basic information for determining the appropriate screw type for various applications.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F140-16: Welding Cold-Formed Steel
Tech Note F140-16: Welding Cold-Formed Steel

Summary: In cold-formed steel construction, welding is a viable connection method. Of the various forms of welding, arc welding is most commonly used to join both cold-formed steel members and hardware components. Prefabrication of roof trusses, panelization of walls, and hardware connections are all ideal applications where welding may be the preferred joining method. This Tech Note provides information on the applicable codes, processes, procedures, design considerations, fabrication and inspection.

This Technical Note updates and replaces CFSEI Technical Note F140-10

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F300-23: Pneumatically Driven Pins for Wood Based Panel Attachment
Tech Note F300-23: Pneumatically Driven Pins for Wood Based Panel Attachment

This Tech Note Updates and Replaces Tech Note F300-09

Summary: Wood-based panels for shear walls and horizontal diaphragms have traditionally been attached to cold-formed steel framing using tapping screws. To increase the speed of installation and to reduce the amount of labor used making these attachments, several companies supply pneumatic nailing systems. These products allow wood-based panels to be fastened to steel in a manner similar to which panels are nailed to wood framing. This Technical Note provides information on specifications, selection, and field inspection of pneumatic drive pins.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F501-11: Cold-Formed Steel Truss To Bearing Connections
Tech Note F501-11: Cold-Formed Steel Truss To Bearing Connections

Summary: This Technical Note is intended as general educational information and to highlight what the building designer should be aware of with regard to truss to bearing connections. Topics addressed include what loads due to wind truss to bearing connections may have to resist, who is ultimately responsible for truss to bearing connection design, general guidance on the design of truss to bearing connections, and an illustrative design example. Loads due to seismic forces are not addressed in this Technical Note.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F502-23: Attachment of Cold-Formed Steel Framing to Precast, Post-Tensioned, and Hollow-Core Concrete
Tech Note F502-23: Attachment of Cold-Formed Steel Framing to Precast, Post-Tensioned, and Hollow-Core Concrete

This Tech Note Updates and Replaces Tech Note F502-18

Precast, prestressed, tilt-up, cast-in-place, and post-tensioned concrete are commonly used in podium construction. It is inevitable that the cold-formed steel design engineer will sooner or later be challenged with attaching cold-formed steel framing to podium construction. Towards this end, it is important for the designer to have a basic understanding of common precast concrete components and why connecting to them can be such a challenge. This Tech Note discusses the types of precast concrete components as well as the cold-formed steel anchorage options.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F602-20: Screw Connections with Other Materials or Gaps Between the Plies
Tech Note F602-20: Screw Connections with Other Materials or Gaps Between the Plies

Summary: Screws are the most common connection type for connecting cold-formed steel members to one another. It is also common for gaps to be provided between members in the form of other materials such as gypsum or insulation, but unfortunately, the current standards do not provide clear direction for the design of screwed connections with gaps in the material. This Tech Note will summarize available test data and propose design guidance based on the available test data.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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Tech Note F701-23: Evaluation of Screw Strength
Tech Note F701-23: Evaluation of Screw Strength

This Tech Note Updates and Replaces Tech Note J100-11

Summary: The design provisions for screw connections contained in the AISI S100, North American Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members contains specific limit states equations that pertain to the design strength of the connecting elements, i.e., sheets. In addition to sheet related design limit states, AISI S100 also provides design provisions for the screw when subjected to either pure shear or pure tension. However, the screw design provisions require that the screw capacity be defined by tests. In the absence of test data, the design engineer is at a loss for evaluating the strength of the screw. This Tech Note provides design guidance for the evaluation of the screw when subjected to pure shear, pure tension and combined shear and tension.

Disclaimer: Designs cited herein are not intended to preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs when these other designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use. CFSEI documents are not intended to exclude the use and implementation of any other design or construction technique.

 

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